#246: Jesus’ Five Remarkable Tests For Leaders

One of the jobs of any good leader is to seek out and develop younger men and women to follow in our footsteps.

Leaders Tests

In the business world where I lived for most of my life the characteristics of leadership we look for in young people included attributes like knowledge of the business, technical and people skills, good judgment, and strong character.

I’ve often thought about how the attributes we tend to look for in future leaders is very different than what we see in leaders portrayed in the Bible.

That difference between man’s standards and God’s came into focus when I listened to a sermon by Pastor Bill Hybels (watch it here) that was recommended to me by a student. In this sermon, Pastor Bill identified five leadership tests Jesus used when He called Peter to be His disciple (Luke 5:1-11).

The five tests as Pastor Bill described them were 1) bias for action, 2) obedience, 3) who deserves the credit, 4) the grander vision, and 5) will you leave it all behind.

1. The Bias for Action Test (Luke 5:3)

Jesus had a large crowd gathering around him at Lake Gennesaret and knew it was an ideal time to preach the Gospel. Jesus got into Peter’s boat and told him to row out into the lake. Peter put down his nets, got into the boat, and rowed into the lake.

Passing the Test. Jesus saw an opportunity to minister to the people and to pass the Bias for Action test Peter needed to respond immediately. This was not a time for Peter to say, “Well, Jesus, I’m a tired right now. I’ve been out on this boat fishing all day, I still have to fix my nets and get them ready for tomorrow, and then I need to get home and have dinner!”

2. The Obedience Test (Luke 5:4)

When Jesus had finished preaching, He told Peter to row further out into the lake and throw out his nets for a catch. Peter started out with an excuse, “I’ve been fishing all day and didn’t catch anything.” But Peter quickly recovered and agreed, saying “But because you say so, I will.”

Passing the Test. Peter’s decision to act and put out the nets to catch fish was done despite his earlier lack of success. Peter obeyed Jesus in faith, and the result was the nets were immediately filled to overflowing. So much so, they had to get help from people on the shore to help them unload all the fish.

3. The Who Deserves the Credit Test (Luke 5:8)

Peter realized the catch was miraculous. He ran and fell down before Jesus confessing his sinful nature. He knew the catch was not because of what he had done but was due to Jesus.

Passing the Test. Peter didn’t thump his chest and proclaim himself to be the greatest fisherman in all the land. He kneeled and confessed his sinfulness knowing that Jesus deserved all the credit.

4. The Grander Vision Test (Luke 5:10)

Once they managed to offload some of the fish, Jesus cast a greater vision before Peter. He told him not to be afraid, from now on he would be a fisher of men!

Passing the Test. Peter was probably a pretty good fisherman who provided for himself and his family. But Jesus’ vision for Peter was grander; Peter was to change his focus from providing for himself to the salvation of others.

5. The Leave It All Behind Test (Luke 5:11)

The final test occurred once they got to shore. Peter left everything and followed Jesus.

Passing the Test. Jesus asked Peter to leave his life of fishing behind and follow Him. Peter left his boat and his nets and followed Jesus because he believed in the grander vision.

Three Key Insights for Leaders

There are three things I think are very important and often overlooked as we read this passage.

  1. The Test Funnel. I see these tests as progressive. If we fail at one, we won’t get the next one. Jesus is looking for people who have a bias for action, will be obedient, who know the credit goes to God, who believe in the grander vision, and are willing to leave something behind to follow Him.
  2. Jesus is with us. Notice in the passage when Peter agreed to put out his nets the language changes to the plural “they” (vv. 6-7). They put down the nets. They caught a lot of fish. Their nets were breaking. We are not working alone when we are working with Jesus. I know sometimes it feels like we are battling evil by ourselves, but we are not, Jesus is right there beside us!
  3. Others will see and follow. When the catch was made, all those with them were astonished, as were Peter’s partners, James and John (vv. 9-10). Then (v. 11) they all left and followed Jesus. This is the power of effective witness. Others will see our good works and be drawn to the Father (Matthew 5:16).

When I feel God calling me, I need to be especially mindful of Jesus’ five remarkable tests for leaders. I need to remember if I fail at one test I may not have the opportunity to do a work for the Kingdom that God has called me to do. I need to remember that whenever I am working for the Kingdom, I am not working alone. And I need to remember all I do is seen by others and done well for Christ’s sake, has the power to draw others to the Father.

Join the Conversation

As always, questions and comments are welcome. How are you doing at Jesus’ five leadership tests? Do you sometimes feel like you are working alone?

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Category: Skills | Leadership Development

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